Tag Archives: opioids

International Pelvic Pain Conference 2017

Restore Motion physical therapists Carrie Cothran, Patrick Wenning,  and Reshma Rathod attended The International Pelvic Pain Society Conference held in Washington DC October 11-15th. When asked to summarize her “take home discovery” from the IPPS Conference, Carrie Cothran replied, “Pain can be viewed as a neuro-immune response.  Structures within the body that aren’t injured may still undergo an inflammatory reaction due to the tissue changes associated with pain. This in turn contributes to long-term protective responses that affect resting muscle tension and ability to do work. The protective responses that occur with pain make the body more vulnerable to injury.”

Patrick Wenning remarked, “At the conference, there was such enthusiasm for better understanding scientific knowledge of the pelvic floor. Most of the time, pelvic floor rehabilitation is new to people and to other PTs mainly because it is an area of the body that people don’t want to talk about. Discussion with fellow participants was frank and enlightening.  They made me feel that I had something to contribute and that I made the right decision to pursue this specialty. I still have a lot to learn as the science continues to uncover more useful information!”

Reshma Rathod added, “Opioids don’t work with Fibromyalgia or chronic pain since the endogenous opioid receptors are already occupied due to changes associated with chronic pain.  When opioids are given for acute pain, they interfere with mood, sleep patterns and contribute to headaches. Ironically, patients may want to continue on the opioid medication to address their depression, difficulty sleeping and headaches.  The body’s dependence opioid medications ‘stick’ with the person making it more difficult to discontinue and cause more problems in the long run.”

Safe Pain Management: Choose Physical Therapy


Avoid Addictive Opioids.  Choose Physical Therapy for Safe Pain Management.

No one wants to live in pain.  But no one should put their health at risk in an effort to be pain free.

Since 1999, Americans have increasingly been prescribed opioids—painkillers like Vicodin, OxyContin, Opana, and methodone, and combination drugs like Percocet.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), sales of prescription opioids have quadrupled in the United States, even though “there has not been an overall change in the amount of pain that Americans report.”

In some situations, dosed appropriately, prescription opioids are an appropriate part of medical treatment.  However, opioid risks include depression, overdose, and addiction, plus withdrawal symptoms when stopping use.  And people addicted to prescription opioids are 40 times more likely to become addicted to heroin.   As of 2014, the CDC estimates that 52 people die each day in the United States as a result of prescription opioid overdose.

In addition, Americans are creatively saving and sharing prescription opioids at alarming rates. These saved and/or shared drugs are now getting in the hands of our children.  Our children are not traditionally popping pills but masking the drugs in various ways.  Drug-laced lollipops are the latest in the drug culture.  This has been reported by high school students in our area. The lollipops are apparently laced with strong levels of painkillers.  This new drug delivery method should raise concern and awareness about the dangers of prescription opioids. Consumers and prescribers are encouraged to choose safer alternatives to prescription opioids.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is urging health care providers to reduce the use of opioids in favor of safe alternatives like physical therapy.

Don’t just mask the pain. Treat it.

Choose physical therapy to manage your pain without the risks and side effects of opioids.


Written by: Reshma Rathod, PT