Tag Archives: pain

Pilates and Your Game

 

PILATES AND YOUR GAME
The Pilates principles of core stabilization address posture, breathing, muscle performance and motor control. Pilates sessions break down faulty movement patterns, and enable the practitioner to work on new movement strategies. Pilates can be integrated into any rehab phase, from the most acute to advanced sport-specific training.

Q: What is Pilates and how do you say it? 
A: Pilates (pronounced Pi-La-Tees) in named after Joseph Pilates who first devised the exercise program during the Second World War. Pilates is a form of exercise that concentrates on the “core” or trunk area, including the stomach and low back, promoting strength and flexibility in a controlled manner. People who do Pilates often describe themselves as getting “longer and leaner”. 

Q: I have some friends who do Pilates mat classes and others who do it on equipment. Is there a difference?
A: Pilates can be done on a mat or the floor, but it can also utilize equipment called reformers that resemble a table with different springs and attachments that alter resistance. There are many different pieces of equipment that are now being used in a Pilates program.

Q: Is it better to take classes or do private lessons?
A: Pilates is a very specific form of exercise, and it is best taught on an individual basis initially. Progressing into small group classes can then be done. Of greatest importance is learning from a highly-qualified Pilates instructor.

Q: Would doing Pilates regularly improve my sports performance?
A: Many people think that powerful tennis strokes come from the arms and shoulders. This is untrue. The power comes from proper weight transfer and rotation of the trunk and hips region. A strong “core” will certainly help the tennis game, and Pilates is an excellent form of exercise for the core region. Pilates can also be made “sport specific” by doing arm and leg movements whilst keeping the trunk stable. In fact, many of the top professional players are now incorporating Pilates into their fitness program to improve their game.

Q: Will I become more flexible and be able to move better?
A: Quite possibly, and in addition to strengthening, Pilates also increases flexibility and will improve any sporting performance. It will even carry over to your golf game!

Q: I have a chronic back problem, is Pilates a good idea?
A: Pilates can be extremely effective for back pain patients. We have seen tremendous results with our caseload of patients, and it is a low impact form of exercise that can be undertaken by people with many different physical conditions. If you already suffer from an ailment, make sure that your Pilates instructor understands the condition and teaches you appropriately.

 

Written by: Reshma Rathod
Picture from: www.premapilatesbarre.com

 

 

Postpartum Pelvic Health: Vol. 1.

During pregnancy and delivery, natural changes occur that impact your pelvic floor and abdominal wall. These changes can cause pain and discomfort for many women during pregnancy and/or after delivery. Childbirth takes a toll on our bodies regardless of the method of delivery.

The toll of postural changes and weight gain on the body can lead to conditions such has back pain, abdominal separation (diastasis recti abdominis), urinary urgency and leakage. It is a misconstrued notion that these symptoms are normal because they are common. Common is not the same as normal. Many women need assistance treating these symptoms so they do not deal with life-long consequences. The good news is therapists at Restore Motion are skilled in treating both pre and postpartum symptoms.

Physical therapy can help pregnant women be strong and fit while decreasing complications during delivery and improving the birth experience. Physical Therapy can also assist postpartum women in regaining their pre-pregnancy body.

 

What a Pain in the Neck

Neck pain is a common reason for doctor visits. It is so common that the topic made it to the Washington Post recently in an article titled “What you need to know about that pain in your neck.”

Here are some facts about neck pain:

  • A common cause of neck pain is poor posture during work, rest or leisure.
  • Lifting or carrying heavy objects can strain muscles connecting your arm/shoulder and neck.
  • Even light weight (or un-weighted) repetitive motions can cause neck pain.
  • Excessive tension or stress frequently causes us to hold our jaw, neck and shoulders in a way that leads to pain and headaches.
  • The joints of the neck allow a great deal of motion. That is why necks are vulnerable to injury with trauma.

What you need to know before you go to the doctor:

  • Majority of neck pain episodes resolve in 2-3 weeks without imaging studies.
  • The older we are the more likely neck pathology will be seen on imaging studies even on those people without neck pain.
  • Over the counter analgesics (Acetaminophen, Ibuprofen, Naproxen Sodium) are more effective in treating neck pain than muscle relaxants.
  • Sleeping with too many pillows or a pillow that is too firm can cause neck pain.

What you can do:

  • Use heat or cold pack to soothe muscle aches. Use the type that feels best to you.
  • Decrease unnecessary weight in your handbag, book-bag or briefcase.
  • Remind yourself to relax your neck, jaw and shoulder muscles while trying to maintain good posture.
  • Consider Physical Therapy to help improve muscle and joint balance via exercises for your neck and shoulder girdle.
  • If pain has not resolved in time, or if your pain was caused by trauma, see your physician or urgent care clinic.

 

Written by: Miriam Graham, PT, DPT
Edited by: Claire Agrawal, PT, DPT

Photo Credit:
http://media2.mindandbodychiro.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/img-neck-pain-spreading-shoulders-450×600.jpg

Link to Washington Post article:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/what-you-need-to-know-about-that-pain-in-your-neck/2016/04/11/5666e97c-a2a3-11e5-b53d-972e2751f433_story.html