Tag Archives: restore motion

Gail Wetzler PT, DPT, EDO, BI-D

Reshma and Miriam first met Gail when they attended her Gynecologic Visceral Manipulation class sponsored by the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) in 2005.  She has been a teacher, mentor and friend ever since.  Gail is a leader and innovator in the development of new courses for women’s health, manual diagnostics, visceral/structural disorders and integrative therapies for animal health.   She teaches these courses for the American Physical Therapy Association, The Upledger Institute and Equinology.  She is the Curriculum Director for the newly developed Barral Institute of Education Research and Manual Therapy.  She also is currently the co-developer of the new MSAR (Masters of Science in Animal Rehab) at Western University. 

She established her private practice in 1979.  Her fields of study include osteopathic manual techniques, exercise physiology, women’s health, functional assessment, movement analysis, laser/modalities, psychoneurobiology, nutrition/digestive dysfunctions, anatomy, animal rehabilitation and integrated manual therapy.

While Gail loves to talk about physical therapy and all of the new exciting concepts that are improving people’s lives, she is equally passionate about the animals in her life.   She loves her new 12-acre ranch in Denver and was able to relocate her two horses when she moved from California.  She and her husband are happy to be near their children and grandchildren.   She is in the process of setting up a “menagerie.”  She now has dogs, cats, and goats, in addition to her horses and humans, so she can enjoy her whole family!

A 1973 graduate from Long Beach State University, Gail gained her orthopedic, acute and administrative background at Hoag Hospital Physical Therapy Department as outpatient clinical supervisor.

Publications include chapters in the following books: Diseases of the Temporomandibular Apparatus by Douglas Morgan, D.D.S., William Hall, M.D. and S. James Vamvas, D.D.S., Visceral Manipulation and Low Back Pain (IFOMT) and Therapeutic Management of Incontinence and Pelvic Pain by J. Laycock, PhD, FCSP and J. Haslam, MCSP, SRP.

Gail’s research includes: “The Effect of Functional Integration on TMJ Disorders”, with Dr. Mark Reese, “The Visceral Relationship to Low Back Pain”, with Dr. Stanley Paris and “The Effects of Manual Therapy on the Brain”, with Dr. Daniel Amen, Dr. Jean Pierre Barral, and Dr. Alain Crobier.

Playing for Two

There are moments in an athlete’s career that are life changing; winning your first title, becoming world number 1, or finding out you are going to be a mother.  For some female athletes, motherhood can be an exciting time; for others finding out you’re with child can leave more questions than answers.  How will this impact my professional career? My lifestyle? Or even my training? Can I still compete while pregnant? For a long time, the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG) has recognized the importance of exercise during pregnancy.  Unlike old beliefs, exercise is now known… For more information, click on PhysicallySpeaking-Playing for two

 

Written by: Reshma Rathod, PT and Thu Tran, MD for WTA (Women’s Tennis Association)

Manual Therapy Treatment for Concussions

Following a concussion, symptoms such as headaches, light sensitivity, dizziness, cognitive difficulty, emotional irritability, depression, and sleep disturbances can often linger. Waiting for the symptoms to improve is a frustrating experience that can impact all areas of an individual’s life. Physical therapists skilled in manual therapy including Craniosacral Therapy, Visceral Manipulation, and Neural Manipulation have observed improvement in many clients’ symptoms post-concussion. These specific manual therapies are gentle therapies that follow the osteopathic principles that structure and function are interrelated. Craniosacral therapy improves the motion restrictions in the craniosacral system which consists of the meninges, bones, and cerebrospinal fluid from the head to the coccyx (base of the spine). Visceral manipulation is a manual therapy developed by a European osteopathic physician Barral that uses gentle, but specific manual forces to improve the mobility of the organs and the connective tissues. Barral Neural Manipulation works to improve the fascial mobility that surrounds all of our nerves allowing the freedom of motion needed for optimal function.

A recent study published by Gail Wetzler and colleagues confirms manual therapy can improve concussion recovery. In the study of 11 male retired professional football players, these specific manual therapies resulted in statistically significant improvements in pain intensity, ROM, memory, cognition, and sleep. For specific changes observed, here is a link to the research study. http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/acu.2017.1222

Gail Wetzler PT was here at Restore Motion this weekend teaching the therapists who already have trained in these manual techniques how to better use these skills to treat individuals with post- concussive symptoms.

 

Written by: Stephanie Bloom, PT

 

“For information on what to do if you or your loved one sustains a concussion, please refer to https://www.cdc.gov/traumaticbraininjury/recovery.html

Image Source: https://www.flagspin.com/youth/youth-flag-football-concussions

 

Pilates and Your Game

 

PILATES AND YOUR GAME
The Pilates principles of core stabilization address posture, breathing, muscle performance and motor control. Pilates sessions break down faulty movement patterns, and enable the practitioner to work on new movement strategies. Pilates can be integrated into any rehab phase, from the most acute to advanced sport-specific training.

Q: What is Pilates and how do you say it? 
A: Pilates (pronounced Pi-La-Tees) in named after Joseph Pilates who first devised the exercise program during the Second World War. Pilates is a form of exercise that concentrates on the “core” or trunk area, including the stomach and low back, promoting strength and flexibility in a controlled manner. People who do Pilates often describe themselves as getting “longer and leaner”. 

Q: I have some friends who do Pilates mat classes and others who do it on equipment. Is there a difference?
A: Pilates can be done on a mat or the floor, but it can also utilize equipment called reformers that resemble a table with different springs and attachments that alter resistance. There are many different pieces of equipment that are now being used in a Pilates program.

Q: Is it better to take classes or do private lessons?
A: Pilates is a very specific form of exercise, and it is best taught on an individual basis initially. Progressing into small group classes can then be done. Of greatest importance is learning from a highly-qualified Pilates instructor.

Q: Would doing Pilates regularly improve my sports performance?
A: Many people think that powerful tennis strokes come from the arms and shoulders. This is untrue. The power comes from proper weight transfer and rotation of the trunk and hips region. A strong “core” will certainly help the tennis game, and Pilates is an excellent form of exercise for the core region. Pilates can also be made “sport specific” by doing arm and leg movements whilst keeping the trunk stable. In fact, many of the top professional players are now incorporating Pilates into their fitness program to improve their game.

Q: Will I become more flexible and be able to move better?
A: Quite possibly, and in addition to strengthening, Pilates also increases flexibility and will improve any sporting performance. It will even carry over to your golf game!

Q: I have a chronic back problem, is Pilates a good idea?
A: Pilates can be extremely effective for back pain patients. We have seen tremendous results with our caseload of patients, and it is a low impact form of exercise that can be undertaken by people with many different physical conditions. If you already suffer from an ailment, make sure that your Pilates instructor understands the condition and teaches you appropriately.

 

Written by: Reshma Rathod
Picture from: www.premapilatesbarre.com

 

 

Postpartum Pelvic Health: Vol. 1.

During pregnancy and delivery, natural changes occur that impact your pelvic floor and abdominal wall. These changes can cause pain and discomfort for many women during pregnancy and/or after delivery. Childbirth takes a toll on our bodies regardless of the method of delivery.

The toll of postural changes and weight gain on the body can lead to conditions such has back pain, abdominal separation (diastasis recti abdominis), urinary urgency and leakage. It is a misconstrued notion that these symptoms are normal because they are common. Common is not the same as normal. Many women need assistance treating these symptoms so they do not deal with life-long consequences. The good news is therapists at Restore Motion are skilled in treating both pre and postpartum symptoms.

Physical therapy can help pregnant women be strong and fit while decreasing complications during delivery and improving the birth experience. Physical Therapy can also assist postpartum women in regaining their pre-pregnancy body.

 

Lowell Weiner, D.D.S., F.A.G.D.

Dr. Lowell Weiner is board certified Dentist practicing through National Intergrated Health Associates. His interests and studies in Holistic health started in 1969, when he first became interested in how jaw and tooth problems affected swallowing, snoring, breathing, the sinuses and the rest of the body’s total compensating mechanisms from head to toe.  Dr Weiner has served either as a consultant, faculty or staff at various universities in the area. He has limited his practice to sleep apnea and dental sleep issues, cranio mandibular dysfunction. He has served as an expert witness and is frequently asked to give second opinions for unusual complex dental medical treatments. The educational and treatment areas on which Dr. Weiner has placed special emphasis are sleep apnea, snoring, the infection and integration of the teeth, head, neck and shoulder with the rest of the body, both as a cause and result of acute and chronic problems.

Outside of work, Dr. Weiner started a fencing club at the University of Maryland and he enjoys cooking.

 

 

Reshma taught Muscle Energy Technique to Women’s Tennis Association Physical Therapists and Miriam taught Sex Therapy U at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology in D.C.

Reshma and Miriam dedicated time to help others in their professional development in January and February.  Reshma taught a nearly full day webinar to physical therapists of the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) February 4th.  The topic was Muscle Energy Technique (MET), an osteopathic manipulation technique where the action of a muscle is used to improve joint range of motion and the ability of muscle to fire.  Reshma and Miriam started their study about and using MET in the 1990’s at Michigan State University School of Osteopathic Medicine CME.  Reshma is one of a hand full of primary health providers in the world for the WTA! 

Miriam also spent February 4th teaching for Sex Therapy U at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology in downtown Washington, DC.  The topic was Women, Sex and Therapy: Ongoing Sexual Pleasure and Couples Interventions for Healing – Treating Pelvic Floor Issues with PT and Sex Therapy.  She presented various issues that affect pelvic floor and sexual function and how physical therapy can help those dysfunctions.  The students got to practice breathing into the pelvic floor, and using racquet balls to roll out muscular trigger points in the legs and back and tips to help their patients understand pelvic floor function.  They also learned ways to help their clients experience and explore communication through touch. 

The staff of Restore Motion is planning to offer a pelvic floor and manual therapy continuing education course for Physical Therapy CEUs in the near future – “watch this space.”

Visceral Mobilization

People don’t think of their internal organs, or viscera, much within the context of physical therapy, however visceral mobility is vital for comfortable and smooth functional mobility. Our viscera are protected by the ribcage and muscular abdominal wall.  They are held in place by a system of ligaments and are contained within a fluid filled sack called the peritoneum.  The viscera need to be able to slide and glide over each other to allow movement of the diaphragm during breathing.  When we inhale, the powerful diaphragm muscle moves down.   The liver, stomach and other organs need to slide down out of the way when the diaphragm descends to allow the lungs to fill with air.  When we exhale, the diaphragm and internal organs slide back up.  Restoring, or improving, visceral mobility is important for normal body function.  If the viscera loose mobility because of disease, inflammation or postural restriction, the result can be pain, decreased functional mobility or decreased organ function.  Luckily, manual therapy to restore visceral mobility is comfortable and effective.  Think about visceral mobility next time you reach to pick something up off of the floor.  If your organs couldn’t slide and glide over each other, you wouldn’t be able to bend to reach the floor or breathe easily. 

Safe Pain Management: Choose Physical Therapy

choosept

Avoid Addictive Opioids.  Choose Physical Therapy for Safe Pain Management.

No one wants to live in pain.  But no one should put their health at risk in an effort to be pain free.

Since 1999, Americans have increasingly been prescribed opioids—painkillers like Vicodin, OxyContin, Opana, and methodone, and combination drugs like Percocet.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), sales of prescription opioids have quadrupled in the United States, even though “there has not been an overall change in the amount of pain that Americans report.”

In some situations, dosed appropriately, prescription opioids are an appropriate part of medical treatment.  However, opioid risks include depression, overdose, and addiction, plus withdrawal symptoms when stopping use.  And people addicted to prescription opioids are 40 times more likely to become addicted to heroin.   As of 2014, the CDC estimates that 52 people die each day in the United States as a result of prescription opioid overdose.

In addition, Americans are creatively saving and sharing prescription opioids at alarming rates. These saved and/or shared drugs are now getting in the hands of our children.  Our children are not traditionally popping pills but masking the drugs in various ways.  Drug-laced lollipops are the latest in the drug culture.  This has been reported by high school students in our area. The lollipops are apparently laced with strong levels of painkillers.  This new drug delivery method should raise concern and awareness about the dangers of prescription opioids. Consumers and prescribers are encouraged to choose safer alternatives to prescription opioids.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is urging health care providers to reduce the use of opioids in favor of safe alternatives like physical therapy.

Don’t just mask the pain. Treat it.

Choose physical therapy to manage your pain without the risks and side effects of opioids.

 

Written by: Reshma Rathod, PT

Constipation: What is it and how can physical therapy help?

 

According to the National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse, someone is constipated if they have a bowel movement less than 3 times a week. This leaves a large range for what is considered “normal” frequency of defecation, from going three times a day (after every meal) to three times a week.

All of us will likely experience constipation at one time or another in our lives. Constipation just means that our food has spent too long in our colon, so more water than usual has been absorbed from the stool leaving it dry and hard to pass. This can be a frustrating symptom, leading to abdominal bloating, gas, increased pressure on the pelvic floor and surrounding organs and back pain. The best treatment is to be aware of the contributing factors and make daily lifestyle changes as needed.

What can lead to constipation?: Factors that may lead to constipation:

  • An imbalance in soluble and insoluble fiber intake, or lack of fiber in your diet
  • Not drinking enough water
  • Not enough physical activity
  • Changes in routine (irregular meal intake, traveling, unusual stress)
  • Ignoring the urge to go to the bathroom
  • Overuse of laxatives
  • Pelvic floor muscle dysfunction (we’ll come back to this later in the post)
  • Sometimes, constipation is a symptom associated with a specific condition such as from suffering a stroke, rectal prolapse, and irritable Bowel Syndrome or IBS. Constipation is common during pregnancy as the abdominal contents must shift and compress to accommodate a growing baby.

Physical therapy for Constipation

  • Help your pelvic floor muscles relax during defecation

When you go to the bathroom, your pelvic floor muscles should relax to “open the gates” and allow passage of stool and urine. Some people lose this normal coordination if they hold tension in their pelvic floor from life stress, or if they’ve had trauma to the pelvis, back, abdominals, or hips (childbirth and surgery). A pelvic floor physical therapist can help your body re-learn proper pelvic floor muscle coordination with biofeedback, manual therapy, and postural education.

  • Perform and teach you manual techniques to stimulate movement through your Intestines

In some cases, performing an abdominal massage can stimulate a bowel movement. Your physical therapist can teach you the massage sequence and appropriate amount of pressure. He/she can also perform visceral manipulation, techniques to restore normal movement in your abdominal organs.

  • Help you become more physically active

Your physical therapist can prescribe exercises to improve your flexibility and strength so that you can be physically active in the community without pain. Establishing a daily exercise routine is an important step in reducing constipation.

 

Photo: http://static.businessinsider.com/image/550b24a46da8115622cd5ecd/image.jpg

 

Written by: Claire Agrawal, PT
Edited by: Miriam Graham, PT